Best German American Day Wishes Messages and Quotes – 6 October 2022

German American Day Wishes Messages: Hello, I am glad you are here. We are going to talk about National German-American Day. It is a day where we celebrate the German heritage of many Americans by attending or hosting events that highlight their culture and history.

The first national celebration was on October 6th, 2021 but it has been celebrated since 1883 when President Chester Arthur proclaimed it to be an official holiday in honor of the arrival of the first large group of Germans who arrived in New York City on October 6th, 1710.

The event has grown into one that celebrates all things German-American with festivals across America including Cincinnati, Ohio; Houston, Texas; Milwaukee Wisconsin; St Louis Missouri, and more!

History Of National German-American Day

National German-American Day is a day to celebrate all the diverse heritage that we share as Americans. The tradition was first established in 1876.

A good way for people who don’t know much about their own culture or history can learn more from these celebrations because they give you access to someone else’s story as well!

On October 27th, 1885, German-American Day was celebrated for the first time at Washington’s Evangelische Stadtkirche (Evangelical city church).

The holiday spread across the United States quickly; by 1891, a German-American Day had been celebrated in at least 18 states.

In 1907, Washington’s Evangelische Stadtkirche hosted the 22nd Annual German-American Day Celebration. In 1909, New York City held its first ‘German Day’ celebration on October 27th to honor the city’s large German population and German-American heritage.

By 1911, New York City Mayor William Jay Gaynor proclaimed that October 27th should be known as ‘German Day’, and renamed the German Savings Bank of Brooklyn on May 19th to “Deutsches Volksbank” (The People’s Bank).

About National German-American Day

National German-American Day is a celebration on October 27 in the United States, first proclaimed by President Chester A.

Arthur to honor Germans who emigrated to America and their contribution to American society. It was recognized as “German-American Day” by Congress in 1983, though it had been celebrated unofficially for years before that date.

The first large group of Germans to immigrate to America arrived in New York City on October 06, 1709. On October 27, 1885, German-American Day was celebrated for the first time at Washington’s Evangelische Stadtkirche (Evangelical city church).

The holiday spread across the United States quickly; by 1891, a German-American Day had been celebrated in at least 18 states.

In 1907, Washington’s Evangelische Stadtkirche hosted the 22nd Annual German-American Day Celebration. In 1909, New York City held its first ‘German Day’ celebration on October 27th to honor the city’s large German population and German-American heritage.

In 1911, New York City Mayor William Jay Gaynor proclaimed that October 27th should be known as ‘German Day’, and renamed the German Savings Bank of Brooklyn on May 19th to “Deutsches Volksbank” (The People’s Bank).

In his proclamation, Mayor Gaynor stated: “We should honor the memory of those sturdy German warriors who fought so bravely for us in our struggles for independence, and who contributed to the making of this great country”.

National German-American Day Date is October 6th in the USA

Every year, October 27th is celebrated as German-American Day. The celebration takes place on every continent except Antarctica and only a few countries have not officially recognized it.

Germany honors national “German-American day” since 1990 with an official ceremony at Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate while Canada has been celebrating National Canadian Deutsch Heritage Month every October since 1991.

As a result of the proclamation, German-American societies across America began celebrating “German Day” on October 27th as well and in 1912 New York City Mayor William Jay Gaynor proclaimed that all stores should close their doors for half an hour at noon to allow employees time to attend the flag-raising ceremony near city hall.

Best German American Day Wishes, Quotes, Messages and Greetings

1. It is an extreme moment of pride for us to have such a wonderful German American as our friend who has made the country proud…. Happy German American Day!!!

2. Today is German American Day, the day which reminds us that we all are one and we take pride in being one.

3. Let us celebrate German American Day by thanking all those who have contributed in making America proud.

4. German American Day reminds us that our hard work and contributions will never go unnoticed…. So keep working hard and keep helping the country grow!!!

5. Though America and Germany are two nations but German American Day celebrates the spirit of being one, being together to work for development.

6. German American Day is a wonderful amalgamation of two nations into one blood and their contribution!!!

7. On the day of German American Day, we celebrate the wonderful work done by German Americans and thank them for their efforts and contribution.

8. Two nations, two cultures but one person….. That is what German American Day is all about…. Cheers to all the contributions and success stories of German Americans.

9. Let us add more meaning to German American Day by working harder to bring more and more glory to America!!!

10. We may be German but we are born and brought up in America and we must contribute to it in all possible ways…. Best wishes on German American Day!!!

How To Celebrate National German-American Day?

German food is known the world over as some of the tastiest foods in existence. Join us for a day celebrating your German-American heritage and invite friends or family members who may not know about this part of you!

The following passage shares information on how to celebrate being german through cooking activities, games, music selections…etc: “Invite close friends & family members that have never experience these things before!”

Every year, October 27th is celebrated as German-American Day. The celebration takes place on every continent except Antarctica and only a few countries have not officially recognized it.

Germany honors national “German-American day” since 1990 with an official ceremony at Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate while Canada has been celebrating National Canadian Deutsch Heritage Month every October since 1991.

A good way for people who don’t know much about their own culture or history can learn more from these celebrations because they give you access to someone else’s story as well!

  1. Visit a museum

The United States is a land of opportunity. Explore the German-American contributions that have made this country great and you could be partaking in your own American Dream!

  1. Make a dish

Invite your friends and family over for a night of wine, cooking recipes from the best chefs in town.

  1. Social Media

Now is the perfect time to celebrate all that Germany and German Americans have given us. Join in on this month-long celebration by using #GermanAmericanHeritageMonth!

National German-American Day Syndrome

A person who is suffering from the National German-American Day Syndrome will usually have a very hard time trying to get out of bed, or off the couch on October 27th.

The syndrome begins with an intense urge to just sit around and watch Netflix for hours upon end without being able to stop. This can sometimes cause severe laziness in some people.

The person may experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress after they are unable to partake in any activities with family members on this holiday. This can cause them to isolate themselves from their friends and families for weeks at a time!

Summary

The third sentence of the second paragraph should read “rancid because they give you access to someone else’s story as well!” The fourth sentence of the fourth paragraph should read “Every year, October 27th is celebrated as German-American Day.”

The fourth sentence of the fifth paragraph should read “The United States is a land of opportunity. Explore the German-American contributions that have made this country great and you could be partaking in your own American Dream!” The third sentence of the sixth paragraph should read “This can sometimes cause severe laziness in some people.”

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